Episode 20: Paul's Most Controversial Songs

Synopsis:

If you enjoy politics and profanity mixed in with your sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll, then this is the episode for you! We discuss the songs that have caused Paul to get into varying degrees of trouble over the course of his career, whether they be songs that have been widely criticized by fans and critics, songs that have caused legal troubles, or songs that had been banned from various media outlets. McCartney's most controversial songs include "Helter Skelter," "Hi Hi Hi," "Big Boys Bickering," and many others.

 

Are there any controversial songs that we forgot? Send us a message at AllMcCartneyPodcast@gmail.com and let us know!

Sources:

Badman, Keith. The Beatles: Off the Record. London: Omnibus Press, 2000.

Doyle, Tom. Man on the Run: Paul McCartney in the 1970s. New York: Ballantine Books, 2013.

Miles, Barry. Paul McCartney: Many Years from Now. New York: Henry Holt, 1997.

McCartney, Paul. Wingspan: Paul McCartney's Band on the Run. London: Bullfinch Press, 2002.

McDonald, Ian. Revolution in the Head: The Beatles' Records and the Sixties. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2007.

McGee, Garry. Band on the Run: A History of Paul McCartney and Wings. New York: Taylor Trade Publishing, 2003.

Perasi, Luca. Paul McCartney: Recording Sessions (1969-2013). Milan: L.I.L.Y., 2013.


McCartney discussed with Howard Stern how The Who inspired "Helter Skelter":


Wings official video for "Mary Had a Little Lamb":


Amid the sounds of dogs barking, Paul and Linda passionately discuss their inspiration behind the song "Give Ireland Back to the Irish" (interview starts at 7:02):


Paul McCartney explained the origins of the song "Frozen Jap" and how he did not intend for the song to be offensive to japanese:


A news story discussing how Paul McCartney's "Big Boys Bickering" was banned from radio and television in the United States:

Episode 19: John Lennon's Contributions to Paul McCartney's Beatles songs

Synopsis:

As John Lennon said, "life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." That lyric is certainly true of us, as we had to take an unexpected hiatus from the podcast. But now we're finally back with a new episode!

We had previously analyzed Paul McCartney's contributions to John Lennon's Beatles songs in episode #9, and so for this episode we explore the opposite scenario: Lennon's contributions to McCartney's Beatles songs. We examine the songs that were primarily authored by McCartney, and how Lennon's contribution drastically altered the song. Lennon's contribution can be in the form of an added section, assistance with lyrics, or a vocal or instrumental performance. We explore songs such as "Michelle," "She's Leaving Home," "Honey Pie," and many others. 

Do you agree or disagree with our song choices? Are there other excellent examples of Lennon's contributions to McCartney's Beatles songs that we may have missed? Drop us an email and let us know: AllMcCartneyPodcast@gmail.com

Sources: 

Badman, Keith. The Beatles: Off the Record. London: Omnibus Press, 2000.

The Beatles - The Beatles in Mono: The Complete Mono Recordings.

The Beatles. The Beatles: The Complete Scores. Milwaukee: Hal Leonard, 1993.

Dowlding, William J. Beatlesongs. New York: Fireside, 1989.

Everett, Walter. The Beatles as Musicians: Revolver through Anthology. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Everett, Walter. The Beatles as Musicians: The Quarry Men through Rubber Soul. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Guesdon, Jean-Michel and Philippe Margotin. All The Songs: The Story Behind Every Beatles Release. New York: Black Dog and Leventhal Publishers, 2013.

McDonald, Ian. Revolution in the Head: The Beatles Records and the Sixties. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2007.

Miles, Barry. Paul McCartney: Many Years from Now. New York: Henry Holt, 1997.

Turner, Steve. A Hard Day's Write: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Song. New York: HarperCollins, 2005.


Composer and musicologist Howard Goodall discusses how the Beatles incorporated a harmonium into their music, which John Lennon played on "We Can Work It Out":


Lennon's contribution to "Michelle" was inspired by Nina Simone's cover of Screamin' Jay Hawkins song, "I Put a Spell on You":


McCartney discusses Lennon's contribution to "Hey Jude":


An early version of "Ob-la-di, Ob-la-da," before Lennon's piano was added:


George Harrison compared John Lennon's guitar solo in "Honey Pie" to Django Reinhardt:

Episode 18: Songs About Jane Asher

Synopsis:

Paul McCartney and his ex-girlfriend, the English actress Jane Asher, had a passionate and tumultuous 5-year relationship, and the evolution of their relationship can be traced through the Beatles-era songs McCartney wrote about her. We explore songs such as "I'm Looking Through You", "And I Love Her", "We Can Work It Out', and many others.

Sources:

The Beatles - The Beatles in Mono: The Complete Mono Recordings.

The Beatles. The Beatles: Complete Scores. Milwaukee: Hal Leonard, 1993.

The Beatles. The Beatles Anthology. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2000.

Davies, Hunter. The Beatles: The Authorized Biography. New York: McGraw Hill, 1968.

Davies, Hunter. The Beatles Lyrics: The Stories Behind the Music, Including the Handwritten Drafts of More Than 100 Classic Beatles Songs. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2014.

Dowlding, William J. Beatlesongs. New York: Fireside, 1989.

Guesdon, Jean-Michel and Philippe Margotin. All the Songs: The Story Behind Every Beatles Release. New York: Black Dog and Leventhal Publishers, 2013.

Miles, Barry. Paul McCartney: Many Years from Now. New York: Henry Holt, 1997.

Sounes, Howard. Fab: An Intimate Life of Paul McCartney. Philadelphia: Da Capo Press, 2010.

Thomas, David, "The Darkness Behind the Smile," Telegraph, 19 August 2004.

Thomas, Steve. A Hard Day's Write: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Song. New York: HarperCollins, 2005.


Footage of the interior of the Asher family's home (57 Wimpole Street, London), where Paul McCartney lived with Jane Asher from 1963 until 1966.


In 1964, Jane Asher starred in the film The Masque of the Red Death, alongside Vincent Price.


In 1966, Jane Asher co-starred in the film Alfie with Michael Caine.


A March 1968 interview with Paul and Jane immediately following their return from mediating in India with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.  Four months later, in July 1968, Jane announced to the media that she and Paul had broken up.


Today, Jane Asher continues to act. She is also an author, and she has a successful cooking accessories business:


Episode 17: Chaos and Creation in the Backyard

Synopsis:

Paul McCartney's 2005 album Chaos and Creation in the Backyard is not only his best album of the 21st century, it's also among his best albums of his entire career. In this episode, we place the songs into the context of what was happening in McCartney's life at the time the album was created, the inspiration and influences behind the songs, and a song-by-song musical analysis of the album's tracks.

Sources:

Binelli, Mark, "Sir Paul Rides Again," Rolling Stone Magazine, 20 October 2005.

Dahlen, Chris, "Sir Paul McCartney," Paste Magazine, 21 May 2007.

Dey, Brent, "Paul McCartney Walks the Fine Line Between Chaos and Creation," Paste Magazine, 26 October 2005. 

Du Noyer, Paul. Conversations with McCartney. New York: Overland Press, 2015.

Hadju, David, "McCartney III," The New Republic, 26 December 2005.

Jisi, Chris, "Paul McCartney Records a Unique Solo Album Without Help From His Friends," Bass Player Magazine, October 2005.

Perasi, Luca. Paul McCartney: Recording Sessions (1969-2013). Milan: L.I.L.Y., 2013.

Sounes, Howard. Fab: An Intimate Life of Paul McCartney. Cambridge: Da Capo Press, 2010.


During the television special Chaos and Creation at Abbey Road (2005), Paul McCartney and Nigel Godrich illustrate some of the techniques and instruments that were incorporated into the making of the album Chaos and Creation in the Backyard


19th century English author Charles Dickens is a reoccurring source of inspiration throughout Chaos and Creation:


When McCartney was composing "English Tea", he envisioned Noel Coward performing it, and incorporated Coward's style of delivery into the song: 


"People Get Ready" by The Impressions (written in 1965 by Curtis Mayfield) inspired Paul McCartney's guitar in his song "Anyway":

Episode 16: Paul & Ringo in the 1970s

Synopsis:

In 2016, Ringo Starr stated to the press about his relationship with Paul McCartney, "we weren't like brothers, we were brothers." And like siblings do, these two former Beatles' relationship has had its ups and downs, particularly in the aftermath of the Beatles breakup. While Paul was having a difficult time with his career in the early 1970s, Ringo was experiencing major success as a solo artist; and while Ringo’s career was on the decline in the mid 1970s, Paul’s career was on an upward trajectory with his new band, Wings. In this episode, we will explore McCartney and Starr's relationship and musical collaborations between the years 1970 to 1979. 

Sources:

Badman, Keith. The Beatles: Off the Record. London: Omnibus Press, 2000.

Clayson, Alan. Ringo Starr: Straight Man or Joker? New York: Paragon House, 1992.

Doggett, Peter. You Never Give Me Your Money: The Battle for the Soul of the Beatles. London: The Bodley Head, 2009.

Doyle, Tom. Man on the Run: Paul McCartney in the 1970s. New York: Ballantine Books, 2013.

Sounes, Howard. Fab: An Intimate Life of Paul McCartney. Cambridge: Da Capo Press, 2010. 

Starr, Michael Seth. Ringo: With a Little Help. Milwaukee, WI: Backbeat Books, 2015.

Starr, Ringo. Postcards from the Boys. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2004.


Ringo discusses his reaction to the breakup of the Beatles and his career in the early 1970s:


Ringo on The David Frost Show (1970) promoting his first solo album, Sentimental Journey. This interview was conducted before Paul's announcement that the Beatles had broken up:


Billy Ward & His Dominoes' version of "Stardust" from 1957 may have inspired Paul McCartney's arrangement of the song for Ringo's Sentimental Journey album (1970):


Footage of Wings' concert in Los Angeles in 1976, and Ringo backstage with the band. What's missing from this footage is Ringo appearing onstage with the band and handing a bouquet of flowers to Wings' Denny Laine: